Soluble Fiber



Diets high in soluble fiber are particularly helpful in promoting healthy blood sugar levels. Numerous studies confirm the importance of complex carbohydrates to the diabetic food pyramid.

One study concluded, “A high level of dietary fiber . . . above the level recommended by the [American Diabetes Association], improves glycemic control, decreases hyperinsulinemia, and lowers plasma lipid concentrations in patients with type II diabetes.”

Complex carbohydrates work by at least two mechanisms. Foods such as vegetables, beans, fruits, and whole grains take longer to chew and digest than refined foods such as white bread and sugar. Fiber slows the emptying of the stomach contents, promoting a feeling of fullness and balanced blood sugar levels.

Complex carbohydrates should be introduced gradually into the diet because it may affect insulin and other diabetic medications, and because it takes some time for the digestive system to adjust to added fiber. The two types of fiber are soluble and insoluble...let’s focus on the soluble type.

Soluble Fiber

Soluble fiber slows gastric emptying and glucose release in the bloodstream. Insoluble types promotes bowel regularity and slows the breakdown of starch, which also has the effect of reducing blood glucose.

Fiber from pectin, gums, mucilages, and some hemicelluloses are all soluble. People commonly associate complex carbs with bran products, but other foods also include whole grains, fruits, vegetables, dried beans and peas, and nuts and seeds.

Optimal daily intake should include a total of 25-30 grams.

Soluble Fiber


Soluble Fiber


Soluble Fiber





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